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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 435 (some duplicates have been removed)
and have witnessed history in the making. >> mexico, oh, yes. >> from presidential elections around the world to the most destructive natural disasters. maria has interviewed dictators, revolutionaries, world leaders, heads of state in latin america, and in the united states. she was among the first female journalists to report from the war torn streets of baghdad. george has covered five wars and right after the terrorists attack on september 11th he drove all the way from miami to new york to report on the tragedy firsthand. once he even asked for a vacation to cover the war in afghanistan. an assignment that at the time the network deemed too dangerous. he's had very public encounters with venezuela's hugo chavez, with former cuban dictator fidel castro. the president of bolivia stood up after only six minutes of questioning by him. both ramos and celines both moderated the first bilingual presidential debate. and most recently with the meet the candidates forum. but perhaps they are best known for defending the rights of immigrants by reporting on their plight and giving a voice
civilizations. in colorado and new mexico, native americans built thriving towns. in the rain forests of mesoamerica, the ancient maya created magnificent city-states. here three million people once lived. in the earliest cradle of civilization, ancient mesopotamian farmers once made these deserts bloom. halfway around the world, in california, are clues to understanding the fall of mesopotamia, as farmers here struggle to overcome a threat to this fertile garden land. the ruins of ancient societies may hold keys to our own survival as, out of the past, archaeologists explore one of the greatest of mysteries -- the decline and fall of grand civilizations. mission control: ignition... and liftoff. liftoff... keach: for more than five millennia, humankind has seemed to dominate earth, both creating and destroying grand civilizations. each of these human experiments has changed our planet. this high vantage point brings us a new and sobering view. for the first time, we behold our world as finite, limited. on the darkened face of earth, the lights of cities record the expansion of our ki
on the southern border with mexico. do you still feel that this is the way to go? >> people said we cannot build a wall. i said, i would get down to the tinker toys and show them. i put together a model and said, this is how we do it. we could build a mile of this per day. this puts aside the argument, that we have 5,500 miles of the great wall of china, but my position is that we do not need 200,000 miles of wall, we just do that until they start going around the end. >> is this a concrete barrier? or a brief explanation? >> when the president ridiculed the wall, he was 600 feet from the fences and the walls and the most down along the border. i would describe this as a kind of concrete system with the foundational trench, and the concrete panels, and if you build the wall up you have to have routes on either side, with the chain-link fence by the border. we are spending $12 billion -- $6 billion per mile. >> talking about immigration is what we're talking about. president obama -- if you join congress which be supportive of this trend continuing? >> the most important thing is to secure the bo
in mexico city today. mexican marines had killed the leader of the glet a's drug cartel. heriberto lazcano in a shootout sunday. the navy announced fingerprints confirmed the identity. then a bizarre twist. gunman stole the body from a funeral home before forensic testing could be completedded. >> the owner of garcia funeral services said that maskedded men subdued the employees, took the body from a funeral home in a hearse and forced the driver to drive the vehicle >> suarez: a death photo of the man was released. still the state attorney general, overseeing the operation, said authorities are confident they got the right man. >> an analysis was done comparing the body and its characteristics with the still pictures on file. this comparison resulted in a positive match. >> suarez: lazcano was one of mexico's most feared drug lords, also known as the executioner. he transformed the zetas from enforcers for the gulf cartel into a powerful rival organization. since then the zetas have been blamed for some of the bloodiest atrocities in mexico's six-year war on drugs but in recent months aut
ranking member of the cartel. and he is accused of taking part in high profile killings in mexico including the murder of u.s. tourist david hartley tiffany's husband on that day on falcon lake. david's wife tiffany joins me right now. tiffany, i wonder if you feel a sense of vindication. >> i feel relief that mexico authorities are final low admitting that david was murder in mexico and that the cartel had involvement. >> so many looked at you as suspicion. was there something going on with tiffany and david. they investigated private life and personal life. how was that to deal with? did that compound or make more aggravating the pain you suffered? >> not only did i lose my husband and witness him being shot and killed and then i am judged and my character was judged . i had questioned. i can't tell you how relieved i am to finally have that part and the critics can't tell me i was involved or anyone else you know. >> how did that lingering suspicion affect your life. >> there was a weight on my shoulders was constantly telling my story and convince people i had no involvement a
by these principles. >> are they principles you had and used when you were governor of new mexico? >> always, always, and i actually delivered one of my state of the state addresses using the seven principles. look, here's how we need to conduct ourselves, and, anyway, just very -- very common sense. >> if you would, your philosophy and libertarian's philosophy on the role of government, the right size of government. >> so libertarian philosophy, with a broad brush stroke, the notion that most of us in the country are socially accepting and that we're fiscally responsible. that's a broad brush stroke, a broad brush stroke is wearing a pin lapel pin saying "i'm pro-choice regarding everything." well, pro-choice regarding everything means that actually if your choices involve putting other people in harm's way or your choices defraud or harm another human being, then that's when the government -- that's where the government has a role, to protect us against individuals, groups, corporations that would do us harm. >> as governor, did you -- did you shrink the size of the state government? do you -- you
on mexico and chile and brazil. one of the great things we're missing right now, it is part of the root of this mess about it -- immigration. our partners are right there. those old movies where people -- there was the girl next door, and the hero tries to fall in love with some likely candidates. she turns out to be loyal and ticks down her hair and -- takes down her hair and glasses. that is mexico. brazil and you'll get all those countries, we have to go look at china. we have to reach out to india. i went down to mexico on an economic development mission and was the first governor to go there in four years from any state. we're missing a tremendous opportunity. >> thank you. governor brown, i'm sure you know that on any given day, people from other states are knocking on doors of co's in the valley and trying to get them to expand in other states or move to other states. someone in this room may have engaged in that. >> they cannot all expand in california. we are try to help california. quex their offering tax breaks. >> we are not offering a break. >> not only you. what do you say
. >>> and the weather was finally perfect in new mexico, allowing felix baumgartner to pull off his death-defying skydive. it was a 4:20 free fall. everyone watching was holding their breath. >> my stom match was up here. he shattered all kinds of record. he became the first skydiver to break the speed of sound. ryan owens has more on fearless fel felix. >> reporter: he began his improbable journey to the edge of space. for 2 1/2 hours, the 43-year-old austrian skydiver floated to 24 miles up. 128,000 feet above the new mexico desert where he opened his capsule, hung his feet out the door. was reminded to remove his seat belt. saluted. and just jumped. he plummeted at 833 miles per hour. so fast, the only way to see him was this infrared camera. the first human to break the sound barrier with just his body, no yet, no rocket. he tumbled out of control for a few tense seconds then righted himself and managed to make a sound. it was enough for mom. high winds delayed liftoff last week. nothing, it seemed, could keep him from the stratosphere. he returned to earth on his feet, with a record
to china malaysia and mexico into what do you want mitt romney to do? >> we basically want mitt romney to come here and explain to us why he's campaigning to create jobs when his company is outsourcing all over the world. >> it is not a new company that came out of nowhere. it's almost 100 years old. it was founded in 1916, and then texas instruments bought it in 1959. then bain capital september in in 2006, and then there is an ipo in 2010 and on schedule to close in 2012. you figure, you know, if a plant is closing things must be terrible. they have to have a reason to close because business must be horrible. look at the profits they made. in 2010 their profits were $592,000. 2011 $660,000. it's just heartbreaking. here are more stories. >> they came in and introduced their transition team. the next bullet on their meeting was by the way by the end of the the 2012 all the jobs will be moved to china. >> we all just--aah. you could hear it in the room. it was just silent the whole time. they were talking away about their company who they were, what they do. >> and then they also info
are about to take a pounding. and this hail in new mexico is just one sign of what's to come. >>> slow ride. thousands line the streets of los angeles as the space shuttle "endeavour" moves to its retirement home. it's a 2-day, 12-mile trip, costing $10 million. we're live this morning, showing you what it takes to move a spacecraft when it's here on earth. >>> the bridal bandit. caught on tape. police are looking for a woman accused of ripping off a wedding gown worth 5 grand. and wait until you see who she has with her at the time. >>> and love lessons. taylor swift talks about her relationships past and present, in her most candid interview yet. what does she really think of john mayer? and did she really kidnap a kennedy? the country darling opens up. >>> do you want to repeat that on-air, dan, what you just said? >> i'm getting abused here. >> this is my jam is what dan harris said. >> even news anchors get a little emo at times, people. >>> with three days until the next presidential debate, team obama is soliciting celebrity help this morning. what role will bruce springsteen and mor
elected come november 6th. in new mexico former county commissioner michelle lujan english ham is the favorite -- grisham is the favorite candidate. and we also expect two new faces from texas. in cd 20, joaquin castro will most likely win the seat currently being held by charlie gonzalez, and in a new district created by reapportionment, vega has excellent opportunities of winning cd 34. texas was a big winner in reapportionment where it picked up four new congressional seats. however, of those four new seats, it appears only one will be held by a latino member of congress. there also are opportunities for latino candidates in competitive districts that are nonlatino majority district cans. three of these are also in california. former lieutenant governor pulled mad doe, a republican, is facing the incumbent, lois capps. this, again, is a completely redrawn district from what lois capps has currently held, and it is a very competitive district, and it's one where the former lieutenant governor has a strong opportunity to the defeat lois capps, and that's a district that's bein
gary johnson. the former republican governor of new mexico talks about his view of the two-party system and obstacles for third-party candidates. from "washington journal," this is 40 minutes. >> host: joining us now is gary johnson, the former governor of new mexico, a republican 1995-2003 who is now the libertarian presidential nominee, and gary johnson, first question. when you look at the major party candidates and this year's cycle, what's missing in the debate and the dialogue? and what do you wring to the table -- what do you bring to the table? >> guest: well, how about truth for starters. the notion that both obama and romney are arguing over who's going to spend more money on medicare when we need to have a raging debate and discussion in this country on how we slash medicare spending because if we don't, um, i believe that we're going to find ourselves in the midst of a monetary collapse as a result of continuing to borrow and spend money to the tune of 43 cents out of every dollar that we spend. >> host: so what are you seeing out there on that particular issue? what's your
. >>> and late news about u.s. border patrol agent killed earlier this week along the arizona/mexico border. nbc's mark potter is in sierra vista, arizona tonight where agent nicholas ivy lived with his family. good evening. >> reporter: good evening to you, brian. federal investigators tell nbc news that based on evidence they've found so far, they are looking into whether this shooting may have been a friendly fire incident. agents shooting at each other. agent nicholas ivy of the border control was shot and killed early tuesday morning while responding to desert sensors that track illegal movement across the border. two other agents were with him. one was wounded. they had reported being fired upon earlier. about five miles north of the border near naco, arizona. officials blamed the shootings on armed criminals and mexican authorities say they have made two arrests related to the case. while u.s. investigators say they have reached no conclusions and still have a lot of work to do, they cannot rule out the possibility this was a friendly fire. brian? >> mark potter with this late development
and the main land of mexico. and i tracked routes all the way down to the border over years and then across the mexican border into sonora and then it a place called penacate and then a dune, 5,000 square miles of sand dunes, a beautiful landscape, but no water out there. but pottery, broken pottery all over in certain places and pieces of shell left behind where you could see that the people were crossing these dunes to the sea and picking up shell and then crossing back and then moving it up to phoenix and then from phoenix distributing it throughout the rest of the southwest. the first trip i took out there, we hit this mountain range right at the edge of the dunes. and we were carrying, i don't know, on that trip we were maybe carrying 80 or 90 pounds of water and moving it out to the sand and then we'd drop a cache and then go back and get more water and drop a cache. we were trying to get to the sea of cortez, that was one of the things on our mind, but this landscape, it starts turning your mind inward or outward or it gets hard to tell which way it turns it because it's a psychologi
above new mexico he became a human missile. felix baumgartner was able to reach such great heights thanks to that helium balloon. in order for a safe liftoff winds could be no more than 3 miles per hour. on his way up, felix baumgartner's breath fogged up his helmet and he complained the the air inside his viesor was not warm enough. the problem was never fixed. >> could see a little bit of frost and for about 30 minutes it looked like we might have to abort the mission. >> reporter: the crew decided the jump was safe. the free fall is the highest known to man but not the longest. it lasted four minutes and 20 seconds. 16 seconds shorter than joe kitinger's record set more than half a century ago. he helped train felix baumgartner and was there from liftoff to landing. >> talk about the right stuff. felix baumgartner's feat came on the 62nd anniversary when chuck yeager first broke the sound barrier. yeager is now 89 years old. flight yesterday flying in the back seat of a fighter. he broke the speed barrier back in 1947. >>> from super sonic travel to a slow speed voyage. coming u
the mexico based company sundlin includes almond and cash auto butter. it impacts, whole foods, safe way, target, and giant. many people got salmonella after eating it. >>> since the iphone 5 release apple has been on the defense. there were a few glitches in the operating system and the map application. now there may be a bug putting you over your data limit. verizon customers noticed their data disappearing even when the phones were on wifi. verizon says they will not charge for the overage and put in a software fix. >>> families have been opening their mail to learn that their daughter has been invited to take part in a beauty contest. who is behind the letters? we check it out so you don't waste your money. >> reporter: every young girl dreams of being a beauty queen. when a letter shows up in the mail saying your daughter is selected for a beauty pageant it is tough to say no, but many times it leads to expense and disappointment. what teen would not want to walk down a run way in front of a crowd. this 13 year old was thrilled to receive an invitation to a pageant. the 2012 miss te
the four corners region from arizona, new mexico, colorado and california meet down to the chijuajua area of new mexico. there was one excavation along the way i remember out in the desert nears winslow, arizona. the desert out there is just a still life with a few landmarks on the horizon and this empty hole, the little colorado river desert, the painted desert, and we were working on a 500-room pueblo dating back to about 1400 ad. i just remember the wind just hailing down on us for days and you would be working down with trowels inside of a trench and if you stop for too long, the sand would start to fill up your hole again because it was blowing so much and everybody was turned away from the wind. so it looked like some kind of religious thing was going on here, all these people bowed to the ground for days and days tinkering with some unimaginable smallness in front of them while the wind just pushed harder and harder, sand blasting across you, filling up all the rooms that you just emptied out as if the desert is rolling back over itself. because even where trails are left, trails d
're celebrating one of mexico's greatest traditions. it's called the day of the dead but it is indeed a celebration. we're going to learn something and show you what it's all about. joining me know is chef omar rodriguez. your restaurant is on 7th street in northwest. >> that's right. >> tell me about the day of the dead. what is it about? it's really a celebration, not a time to mourn. >> exactly. it's a celebration every year, november 1 and 2nd. mexicans around the country, around mexico celebrate. the whole idea behind it is you're actually celebrating the people that have passed o. it's not a mourning. it's a big festival. there's parades. people actually go to the cemetery. they bring food, beverage. they'll read up ins. they'll tell them everything -- read newspapers. they'll tell them everything that's going on with the family. >> it's a time to reconnect. this looks like a porcupine. >> yes. >> these are examples of art you have throughout the table, too. >> the different creatures that are actually on the table are hand carved, hand painted in various villages. >> these are
"fast and furious." thousands of additional guns found in mexico tracked back to the u.s. government. dozens of them believe to be used in violent crimes. >> who is going to pay for this? >> are military voters being treated fairly? >> it's really shocking, but most of the fingers point straight to the pentagon. >> mu afghanistan policy questions. >> terrorism has not gone away. it has increased. >> brit hume's analysis of the president's economic message. arapahoe county is largely suburban area southeast of denver, home to aerospace engineers and business managers and other professionals. there are some very affluent areas but for the most part it's the upper tier of the middle class. in 2008, barack obama carried this county by more than 35,000 votes. four years before that, george w. bush carried it by more than 9,000. the unemployment rate here is the national average. but it is below the state unemployment rate. another interesting stat about arapahoe county, 54% of the registered voters are women. one of the widest gender gaps in any county in colorado. which is why the obama
mexico, gary johnson. cnn orc poll last month found johnson polling 3% of the voters nationwide. the chairman of the rnc, reince priebus, says he's not worried about a gary johnson. >> well, understand that they are not going to throw their vote away when we have an election here that's about the future of the america. i just don't see that happening. in fact, i see that it's almost a nonfactor. and so i -- i'm not worried about it. >> with me now, former new mexico governor and a republican when he was governor in new mexico, gary johnson. governor johnson, good morning. >> chuck, great to be with you. thank you. >> let me ask you this. what are you advocating that you don't think is being advocated by either president obama or mitt romney? >> let's not bomb iran, let's get out of afghanistan tomorrow, bring the troops home, marriage equality, that it's a constitutional right. i would have never signed the defense authorization act. balance the federal budget now. eliminate income tax, corporate tax, abolish the irs and replace that with one federal consumption tax which i thin
're live from roswell, new mexico. they've just now given the weather clear. ginger zee has done a lot of crazy stuff for the sake of this broadcast. what do you think? >> right after felix does it. >> he's setting the bar high. >> that's the proper attitude of caution. >>> who says becoming a parent means giving up any daredevil indulgences? one dad satisfied his need for speed with this souped up stroller. peter, i hope you're not watching. >>> we're going switch gears. beginning with the breaking news out of colorado and the hunt for a child predator. police are investigating an attempted abduction overnight, following the disappearance and murder of 10-year-old jessica ridgeway. no word if there is a connection yet. an entire community is on edge. here's abc's clayton sandell. >> reporter: in a community attempted abduction, just 12 miles down the road from where jessica ridgeway was killed. someone tried to snatch a 13-year-old boy. his mom snapped a picture of this car. >> i think all children should pay attention to what they're doing. >> reporter: there is sadness, anger, fear.
the mugion rim, to mexico and then into the sierra madre, following people, following routes. because everything in the desert leaves a route that leads you somewhere. everything out there is a story. and that's what i'm following, these stories, looking for ways, looking for grains of sand out of place, looking for stories out in the middle of nowhere. i can open this up for questions if anybody has any questions. . >> i was wondering if they had any sort of metal or did they use hardened rocks of some sort to shape their stones? . >> most of what they did was stone. metallurgy was just starting to move up into northern chijuajua at that time and they were working with copper. that was just ornamental, so there was no metal going on at all other than imported bells. >> and the shells, they went down to cortez -- not lake -- the cortez sea to get, was that mostly hard or brittle? . >> it was hard but not tool hard. the colorado plateau is covered with chert, a glassy rock that is really really good for making tools, making very sharp edges. you find there are pieces of chert all over
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 435 (some duplicates have been removed)